Volume 4 (2014)

The Journal of Public Scholarship in Higher Education
Volume 4 (2014)

Previously published in print.

Editorial

Hanna Arendt on Burton Street: Re-Storying Community with a Political Theorist

Kenneth A. Betsalel
University of North Carolina Asheville

Pages 4-11

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Articles

Creating Significant Learning Experiences through Civic Engagement: Practical Strategies for Community-Engaged Pedagogy

Dan Trudeau and Tina P. Kruse
Macalester College

This article examines two case studies that describe different ways of working with community partners to create civic engagement experiences in undergraduate education. Analysis of the case studies yields guidance about practical decisions involved in planning, designing, and executing pedagogy that uses engagement to generate what Fink calls “significant learning experiences.” Emphasis is placed on several key considerations of goals, process, and outcomes for designing courses with community partnerships. The article also highlights a rationale for sponsoring community-engaged pedagogy and identifies the types of resources such work requires to be effective.

Pages 12-30

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Market Incentives and International Volunteers: The Development and Evaluation of Fair Trade Learning

Eric Hartman
Kansas State University

Cassandra Chaire
Plan International USA

As a component of university international education programming, international volunteerism and global community engagement by university students and faculty are on the rise. While the benefits to student learning related to this kind of programming have been well researched, community impact is rarely assessed. This article considers the community impact of these practices. The evaluation process piloted here grew from a civil society articulation of Fair Trade Learning (FTL), which aspires to ensure community concerns are at the center of community-engaged international education efforts. We begin by clarifying the development of this FTL ideal while documenting the need for it within the international education and international volunteerism sectors. We then situate FTL within the relevant service-learning, international volunteerism, tourism, and international development literature before demonstrating how research on domestic university-community partnerships (Stoecker & Tryon, 2009) led us to develop a mixed methods evaluation of those partnerships in four different locations around the world. We close by discussing the results and sharing implications for FTL, volunteerism, and global university-community engagement.

Pages 36-68

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Community-Based Research in Graduate Education: Implementing Program Decisions Across the Disciplines

Karen I. Case
University of Hartford

Community-Based Research (CBR) has been recognized as a significant reform agent within graduate education. This article explores the decisions involved in implementing a CBR model into graduate education programs. It uses the doctoral program in educational leadership at the University of Hartford as an example of how CBR can be employed to support the development of leadership, collaborative, and research competencies for graduate students, particularly in the area of school practice. The article concludes by highlighting particular decision points and recommendations for graduate faculty and community members to consider for assuring equitable partnerships in CBR.

Pages 69-92

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Parent Leaders Taking the Lead: Capacity Building and Co-Constructed Relevance in Community-Engaged Research

Paige M. Bray and Erin M. Kenney
University of Hartford

This article reflects on a multi-year project involving participatory research with parents. Specifically, it reports on an ongoing capacity-building endeavor that consciously places parents at the center of a parent education project – wherein parents are regarded as project participants, possessing valued knowledge, rather than as more traditional passive research participants. Based in participatory action research, systematic inquiry methods are used to determine the project issues and engage all participants in co-construction of knowledge. By building capacity in parents, we observed improved outcomes in their own lives as well as in the lives of the children they nurtured. Implications of our study for the growth in public scholarship are explored.

Pages 93-109

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Review Essay

Review of Learning in the Plural: Essays on the Humanities and Public Life (Michigan State University Press, 2014)

Robert J. Topinka
Northwestern University

Pages 110-113

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